Federal Coordinating Lead Author:
Charles Luce, USDA Forest Service
Chapter Lead:
Christine May, Silvestrum Climate Associates
Chapter Authors:
Joe Casola, Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington
Michael Chang, Makah Tribe
Jennifer Cuhaciyan, Bureau of Reclamation
Meghan Dalton, Oregon State University
Scott Lowe, Boise State University
Gary Morishima, Quinault Indian Nation
Philip Mote, Oregon State University
Alexander (Sascha) Petersen, Adaptation International
Gabrielle Roesch-McNally, USDA Forest Service
Emily York, Oregon Health Authority
Review Editor:
Beatrice Van Horne, USDA Forest Service, Northwest Climate Hub
USGCRP Coordinators:
Natalie Bennett, Adaptation and Assessment Analyst
Christopher W. Avery, Senior Manager
Susan Aragon-Long, Senior Scientist

Northwest

TRACEABLE ACCOUNTS

Process Description

This assessment focuses on different aspects of the interaction between humans, the natural environment, and climate change, including reliance on natural resources for livelihoods, the less tangible values of nature, the built environment, health, and frontline communities. Therefore, the author team required a depth and breadth of expertise that went beyond climate change science and included social science, economics, health, tribes and Indigenous people, frontline communities, and climate adaptation, as well as expertise in agriculture, forestry, hydrology, coastal and ocean dynamics, and ecology. Prospective authors were nominated by their respective agencies, universities, organizations, or peers. All prospective authors were interviewed with respect to the qualifications, and selected authors committed to remain part of the team for the duration of chapter development.

The chapter was developed through technical discussions of relevant evidence and expert deliberation by the report authors at workshops, weekly teleconferences, and email exchanges. The author team, along with the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), also held stakeholder meetings in Portland and Boise to solicit input and receive feedback on the outline and draft content under consideration. A series of breakout groups during the stakeholder meetings provided invaluable feedback that is directly reflected in how the Key Messages were shaped with respect to Northwest values and the intersection between humans, the natural environment, and climate change. The authors also considered inputs and comments submitted by the public, interested stakeholders, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and federal agencies. For additional information on the overall report process, see Appendix 1: Process. The author team also engaged in targeted consultations during multiple exchanges with contributing authors for other chapters, who provided additional expertise on subsets of the Traceable Accounts associated with each Key Message.

The climate change projections and scenarios used in this assessment have been widely examined and presented elsewhere11,50,263,264 and are not included in this chapter. Instead, this chapter focuses on the impact of those projections on the natural resources sector that supports livelihoods (agriculture, forestry, fisheries, and outdoor recreation industry), the intangible values provided by the natural environment (wildlife, habitat, tribal cultures and well-being, and outdoor recreation experiences), human support systems (built infrastructure and health), and frontline communities (farmworkers, tribes, and economically disadvantaged urban communities). The literature cited in this chapter is largely specific to the Northwest states: Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. In addition, the authors selected a series of case studies that highlight specific impacts, challenges, adaptation strategies and successes, and collaborations that are bringing communities together to build climate resilience. The most significant case study is the 2015 case study (Box 24.7), which cuts across all five Key Messages and highlights how extreme climate variability that is happening now may become more normal in the future, providing important insights that can help inform and prioritize adaptation efforts.


KEY MESSAGES


See Full Chapter & References