Federal Coordinating Lead Author:
David Reidmiller, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Chapter Lead:
Alexa Jay, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Chapter Authors:
Christopher W. Avery, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Daniel Barrie, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Apurva Dave, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Benjamin DeAngelo, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Matthew Dzaugis, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Michael Kolian, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Kristin Lewis, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Katie Reeves, U.S. Global Change Research Program
Darrell Winner, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Overview

Some climate-related impacts, such as increasing health risks from extreme heat, are common to many regions of the United States (Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 1). Others represent more localized risks, such as infrastructure damage caused by thawing of permafrost (long-frozen ground) in Alaska or threats to coral reef ecosystems from warmer and more acidic seas in the U.S. Caribbean, as well as Hawai‘i and the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands (Ch. 26: Alaska, KM 2; Ch. 20: U.S. Caribbean, KM 2; Ch. 27: Hawai‘i & Pacific Islands, KM 4). Risks vary by both a community’s exposure to physical climate impacts and by factors that influence its ability to respond to changing conditions and to recover from adverse weather and climate-related events such as extreme storms or wildfires (Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 2; Ch. 15: Tribes, State of the Sector, KM 1 and 2; Ch. 28: Adaptation, KM 4).

Many places are subject to more than one climate-related impact, such as extreme rainfall combined with coastal flooding, or drought coupled with extreme heat, wildfire, and flooding. The compounding effects of these impacts result in increased risks to people, infrastructure, and interconnected economic sectors (Ch. 11: Urban, KM 1). Impacts affecting interconnected systems can cascade across sectors and regions, creating complex risks and management challenges. For example, changes in the frequency, intensity, extent, and duration of wildfires can result in a higher instance of landslides that disrupt transportation systems and the flow of goods and services within or across regions (Box 1.3). Many observed impacts reveal vulnerabilities in these interconnected systems that are expected to be exacerbated as climate-related risks intensify. Under a higher scenario (RCP8.5), it is very likely that some impacts, such as the effects of ice sheet disintegration on sea level rise and coastal development, will be irreversible for many thousands of years, and others, such as species extinction, will be permanent (Ch. 7: Ecosystems, KM 1; Ch. 9: Oceans, KM 1; Ch. 29: Mitigation, KM 2).

Economy and Infrastructure

Without more significant global greenhouse gas mitigation and regional adaptation efforts, climate change is expected to cause substantial losses to infrastructure and property and impede the rate of economic growth over this century (Ch. 4: Energy, KM 1; Ch. 8: Coastal, KM 1; Ch. 11: Urban, KM 2; Ch. 12: Transportation, KM 1; Regional Chapters 18–27). Regional economies and industries that depend on natural resources and favorable climate conditions, such as agriculture, tourism, and fisheries, are increasingly vulnerable to impacts driven by climate change (Ch. 7: Ecosystems, KM 3; Ch. 10: Agriculture, KM 1). Reliable and affordable energy supplies, which underpin virtually every sector of the economy, are increasingly at risk from climate change and weather extremes (Ch. 4: Energy, KM 1). The impacts of climate change beyond our borders are expected to increasingly affect our trade and economy, including import and export prices and U.S. businesses with overseas operation and supply chains (Box 1.4) (Ch. 16: International, KM 1; Ch. 17: Complex Systems, KM 1). Some aspects of our economy may see slight improvements in a modestly warmer world. However, the continued warming that is projected to occur without significant reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions is expected to cause substantial net damage to the U.S. economy, especially in the absence of increased adaptation efforts. The potential for losses in some sectors could reach hundreds of billions of dollars per year by the end of this century (Ch. 29: Mitigation, KM 2).

Widespread Impacts from Hurricane Harvey

Widespread Impacts from Hurricane Harvey
Figure 1.6: Hurricane Harvey led to widespread flooding and knocked out power to 300,000 customers in Texas in …

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Existing water, transportation, and energy infrastructure already face challenges from heavy rainfall, inland and coastal flooding, landslides, drought, wildfire, heat waves, and other weather and climate events (Figures 1.5–1.9) (Ch. 11: Urban, KM 2; Ch. 12: Transportation, KM 1). Many extreme weather and climate-related events are expected to become more frequent and more intense in a warmer world, creating greater risks of infrastructure disruption and failure that can cascade across economic sectors (Ch. 3: Water, KM 2; Ch. 4: Energy, KM 1; Ch. 11: Urban, KM 3; Ch. 12: Transportation, KM 2). For example, more frequent and severe heat waves and other extreme events in many parts of the United States are expected to increase stresses on the energy system, amplifying the risk of more frequent and longer-lasting power outages and fuel shortages that could affect other critical sectors and systems, such as access to medical care (Ch. 17: Complex Systems, Box 17.5; Ch. 4: Energy, KM 1; Ch. 8: Coastal, KM 1; Ch. 11: Urban, KM 3; Ch. 12: Transportation, KM 3). Current infrastructure is typically designed for historical climate conditions (Ch. 12: Transportation, KM 1) and development patterns—for instance, coastal land use—generally do not account for a changing climate (Ch. 5: Land Changes, State of the Sector), resulting in increasing vulnerability to future risks from weather extremes and climate change (Ch. 11: Urban, KM 2). Infrastructure age and deterioration make failure or interrupted service from extreme weather even more likely (Ch. 11: Urban, KM 2). Climate change is expected to increase the costs of maintaining, repairing, and replacing infrastructure, with differences across regions (Ch. 12: Transportation, Regional Summary).

Flooding at Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant

Flooding at Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant
Figure 1.7: Floodwaters from the Missouri River surround the Omaha Public Power District’s Fort Calhoun Station, …

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Recent extreme events demonstrate the vulnerabilities of interconnected economic sectors to increasing risks from climate change (see Box 1.3). In 2017, Hurricane Harvey dumped an unprecedented amount of rainfall over the greater Houston area, some of which has been attributed to human-induced climate change (Ch. 2: Climate, Box 2.5). Resulting power outages had cascading effects on critical infrastructure facilities such as hospitals and water and wastewater treatment plants. Reduced oil production and refining capacity in the Gulf of Mexico caused price spikes regionally and nationally from actual and anticipated gasoline shortages (Figure 1.6) (Ch. 17: Complex Systems, KM 1). In the U.S. Caribbean, Hurricanes Irma and Maria caused catastrophic damage to infrastructure, including the complete failure of Puerto Rico’s power grid and the loss of power throughout the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as extensive damage to the region’s agricultural industry. The death toll in Puerto Rico grew in the three months following Maria’s landfall on the island due in part to the lack of electricity and potable water as well as access to medical facilities and medical care (Ch. 20: U.S. Caribbean, Box 20.1, KM 5).

Norfolk Naval Base at Risk from Rising Seas

Norfolk Naval Base at Risk from Rising Seas
Figure 1.8: Low-lying Norfolk, Virginia, houses the world’s largest naval base, which supports multiple aircraft …

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Climate-related risks to infrastructure, property, and the economy vary across regions. Along the U.S. coastline, public infrastructure and $1 trillion in national wealth held in coastal real estate are threatened by rising sea levels, higher storm surges, and the ongoing increase in high tide flooding (Figures 1.4 and 1.8) (Ch. 8: Coastal, KM 1). Coastal infrastructure provides critical lifelines to the rest of the country, including energy supplies and access to goods and services from overseas trade; increased damage to coastal facilities is expected to result in cascading costs and national impacts (Ch. 8: Coastal, KM 1; Ch. 4: Energy, State of the Sector, KM 1). High tide flooding is projected to become more disruptive and costlier as its frequency, depth, and inland extent grow in the coming decades. Without significant adaptation measures, many coastal cities in the Southeast are expected to experience daily high tide flooding by the end of the century (Ch. 8: Coastal, KM 1; Ch. 19: Southeast, KM 2). Higher sea levels will also cause storm surge from tropical storms to travel farther inland than in the past, impacting more coastal properties and infrastructure (Ch. 8: Coastal: KM 1; Ch. 19: Southeast, KM 2). Oil, natural gas, and electrical infrastructure located along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico are at increased risk of damage from rising sea levels and stronger hurricanes; regional disruptions are expected to have national implications (Ch. 4: Energy, State of the Sector, KM 1; Ch. 18: Northeast, KM 3; Ch. 19: Southeast, KM 2). Hawai‘i and the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands and the U.S. Caribbean also face high risks to critical infrastructure from coastal flooding, erosion, and storm surge (Ch. 4: Energy, State of the Sector; Ch. 20: U.S. Caribbean, KM 3; Ch. 27: Hawai‘i & Pacific Islands, KM 3).

   

Figure 1.9: Weather and Climate-Related Impacts on U.S. Military Assets

Weather and Climate-Related Impacts on U.S. Military Assets
Figure 1.9: The Department of Defense (DoD) has significant experience in planning for and managing risk and uncertainty. The effects of climate and extreme weather represent additional risks to incorporate into the Department’s various planning and risk management processes. To identify DoD installations with vulnerabilities to climate-related impacts, a preliminary Screening Level Vulnerability Assessment Survey (SLVAS) of DoD sites worldwide was conducted in 2015. The SLVAS responses (shown for the United States; orange dots) yielded a wide range of qualitative information. The highest number of reported effects resulted from drought (782), followed closely by wind (763) and non-storm surge related flooding (706). About 10% of sites indicated being affected by extreme temperatures (351), while flooding due to storm surge (225) and wildfire (210) affected about 6% of the sites reporting. The survey responses provide a preliminary qualitative picture of DoD assets currently affected by severe weather events as well as an indication of assets that may be affected by sea level rise in the future. Source: adapted from Department of Defense 2018 (LINK).

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In the western United States, increasing wildfire is damaging ranches and rangelands as well as property in cities near the wildland–urban interface. Drier conditions are projected to increase the risk of wildfires and damage to property and infrastructure, including energy production and generation assets and the power grid (Ch. 4: Energy, KM 1; Ch. 11: Urban, Regional Summary; Ch. 24: Northwest, KM 3). In Alaska, thawing of permafrost is responsible for severe damage to roads, buildings, and pipelines that will be costly to replace, especially in remote parts of Alaska. Alaska oil and gas operations are vulnerable to thawing permafrost, sea level rise, and increased coastal exposure due to declining sea ice; however, a longer ice-free season may enhance offshore energy operations and transport (Ch. 4: Energy, State of the Sector; Ch. 26: Alaska, KM 2 and 5). These impacts are expected to grow with continued warming.

U.S. agriculture and the communities it supports are threatened by increases in temperatures, drought, heavy precipitation events, and wildfire on rangelands (Figure 1.10) (Ch. 10: Ag & Rural, KM 1 and 2, Case Study “Groundwater Depletion in the Ogallala Aquifer Region”; Ch. 23: S. Great Plains, KM 1, Case Study “The Edwards Aquifer”). Yields of major U.S. crops (such as corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, sorghum, and cotton) are expected to decline over this century as a consequence of increases in temperatures and possibly changes in water availability and disease and pest outbreaks (Ch. 10: Ag & Rural, KM 1). Increases in growing season temperatures in the Midwest are projected to be the largest contributing factor to declines in U.S. agricultural productivity (Ch. 21: Midwest, KM 1). Climate change is also expected to lead to large-scale shifts in the availability and prices of many agricultural products across the world, with corresponding impacts on U.S. agricultural producers and the U.S. economy (Ch. 16: International, KM 1).

Conservation Practices Reduce Impact of Heavy Rains

Conservation Practices Reduce Impact of Heavy Rains
Figure 1.10: Increasing heavy rains are leading to more soil erosion and nutrient loss on midwestern cropland. …

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Extreme heat poses a significant risk to human health and labor productivity in the agricultural, construction, and other outdoor sectors (Ch. 10: Ag & Rural, KM 3). Under a higher scenario (RCP8.5), almost two billion labor hours are projected to be lost annually by 2090 from the impacts of temperature extremes, costing an estimated $160 billion in lost wages (Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 4). States within the Southeast (Ch. 19: Southeast, KM 4) and Southern Great Plains (Ch. 23: S. Great Plains, KM 4) regions are projected to experience some of the greatest impacts (see Figure 1.21).

Natural Environment and Ecosystem Services

Climate change threatens many benefits that the natural environment provides to society: safe and reliable water supplies, clean air, protection from flooding and erosion, and the use of natural resources for economic, recreational, and subsistence activities. Valued aspects of regional heritage and quality of life tied to the natural environment, wildlife, and outdoor recreation will change with the climate, and as a result, future generations can expect to experience and interact with natural systems in ways that are much different than today. Without significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, extinctions and transformative impacts on some ecosystems cannot be avoided, with varying impacts on the economic, recreational, and subsistence activities they support.

Impacts of Drought on Texas Agriculture

Impacts of Drought on Texas Agriculture
Figure 1.11: Soybeans in Texas experience the effects of drought in August 2013. During 2010–2015, a multiyear …

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Changes affecting the quality, quantity, and availability of water resources, driven in part by climate change, impact people and the environment (Ch. 3: Water, KM 1). Dependable and safe water supplies for U.S. Caribbean, Hawai‘i, and U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Island communities and ecosystems are threatened by rising temperatures, sea level rise, saltwater intrusion, and increased risks of drought and flooding (Ch. 3: Water, Regional Summary; Ch. 20: U.S. Caribbean, KM 1; Ch. 27: Hawai‘i & Pacific Islands, KM 1). In the Midwest, the occurrence of conditions that contribute to harmful algal blooms, which can result in restrictions to water usage for drinking and recreation, is expected to increase (Ch. 3: Water, Regional Summary; Ch. 21: Midwest, KM 3). In the Southwest, water supplies for people and nature are decreasing during droughts due in part to climate change.

Intensifying droughts, heavier downpours, and reduced snowpack are combining with other stressors such as groundwater depletion to reduce the future reliability of water supplies in the region, with cascading impacts on energy production and other water-dependent sectors (Ch. 3: Water, Regional Summary; Ch. 4: Energy, State of the Sector; Ch. 25: Southwest, KM 5). In the Southern Great Plains, current drought and projected increases in drought length and severity threaten the availability of water for agriculture (Figures 1.11 and 1.12) (Ch. 23: S. Great Plains, KM 1). Reductions in mountain snowpack and shifts in snowmelt timing are expected to reduce hydropower production in the Southwest and the Northwest (Ch. 24: Northwest, KM 3; Ch. 25: Southwest, KM 5). Drought is expected to threaten oil and gas drilling and refining as well as thermoelectric power plants that rely on a steady supply of water for cooling (Ch. 4: Energy, State of the Sector, KM 1; Ch. 22: N. Great Plains, KM 4; Ch. 23: S. Great Plains, KM 2; Ch. 25: Southwest, KM 5).

   

Figure 1.12: Desalination Plants Can Reduce Impacts from Drought in Texas

Texas Desalination Plants
Figure 1.12: Desalination activities in Texas are an important contributor to the state’s efforts to meet current and projected water needs for communities, industry, and agriculture. The state’s 2017 Water Plan recommended an expansion of desalination to help reduce longer-term risks to water supplies from drought, higher temperatures, and other stressors. There are currently 44 public water supply desalination plants in Texas. From Figure 23.8, Ch. 23: S. Great Plains (Source: adapted from Texas Water Development Board 2017).

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Tourism, outdoor recreation, and subsistence activities are threatened by reduced snowpack, increases in wildfire activity, and other stressors affecting ecosystems and natural resources (Figures 1.2d, 1.2k, and 1.13) (Ch. 7: Ecosystems, KM 3). Increasing wildfire frequency (Ch. 19: Southeast, Case Study “Prescribed Fire”), pest and disease outbreaks (Midwest, Case Study “Adaptation in Forestry”), and other stressors are projected to reduce the ability of U.S. forests to support recreation as well as economic and subsistence activities (Ch. 6: Forests, KM 1 and 2; Ch. 19: Southeast, KM 3; Ch. 21: Midwest, KM 2). Increases in wildfire smoke events driven by climate change are expected to reduce the amount and quality of time spent in outdoor activities (Ch. 13: Air Quality, KM 2; Ch. 24: Northwest, KM 4). Projected declines in snowpack in the western United States and shifts to more precipitation falling as rain than snow in the cold season in many parts of the central and eastern United States are expected to adversely impact the winter recreation industry (Ch. 18: Northeast, KM 1; Ch. 22: N. Great Plains, KM 3; Ch. 24: Northwest, KM 1, Box 24.7). In the Northeast, activities that rely on natural snow and ice cover may not be economically viable by the end of the century without significant reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions (Ch. 18: Northeast, KM 1). Diminished snowpack, increased wildfire, pervasive drought, flooding, ocean acidification, and sea level rise directly threaten the viability of agriculture, fisheries, and forestry enterprises on tribal lands across the United States and impact tribal tourism and recreation sectors (Ch. 15: Tribes, KM 1).

Razor Clamming on the Washington Coast

Razor Clamming on the Washington Coast
Figure 1.13: Razor clamming draws crowds on the coast of Washington State. This popular recreation activity is …

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Climate change has already had observable impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems throughout the United States that are expected to continue. Many species are shifting their ranges (Figure 1.2h), and changes in the timing of important biological events (such as migration and reproduction) are occurring in response to climate change (Ch. 7: Ecosystems, KM 1). Climate change is also aiding the spread of invasive species (Ch. 21: Midwest, Case Study “Adaptation in Forestry”; Ch. 22: N. Great Plains, Case Study “Crow Nation and the Spread of Invasive Species”), recognized as a major driver of biodiversity loss and substantial ecological and economic costs globally (Ch. 7: Ecosystems, Invasive Species). As environmental conditions change further, mismatches between species and the availability of the resources they need to survive are expected to occur (Ch. 7: Ecosystems, KM 2). Without significant reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, extinctions and transformative impacts on some ecosystems cannot be avoided in the long term (Ch. 9: Oceans, KM 1). While some new opportunities may emerge from ecosystem changes, economic and recreational opportunities and cultural heritage based around historical use of species or natural resources in many areas are at risk (Ch. 7: Ecosystems, KM 3; Ch. 18: Northeast, KM 1 and 2, Box 18.6).

Ocean warming and acidification pose high and growing risks for many marine organisms, and the impacts of climate change on ocean ecosystems are expected to lead to reductions in important ecosystem services such as aquaculture, fishery productivity, and recreational opportunities (Ch. 9: Oceans, KM 2). While climate change impacts on ocean ecosystems are widespread, the scope of ecosystem impacts occurring in tropical and polar areas is greater than anywhere else in the world. Ocean warming is already leading to reductions in vulnerable coral reef and sea ice habitats that support the livelihoods of many communities (Ch. 9: Oceans, KM 1). Decreasing sea ice extent in the Arctic represents a direct loss of important habitat for marine mammals, causing declines in their populations (Figure 1.2f) (Ch. 26: Alaska, Box 26.1). Changes in spring ice melt have affected the ability of coastal communities in Alaska to meet their walrus harvest needs in recent years (Ch. 26: Alaska, KM 1). These changes are expected to continue as sea ice declines further (Ch. 2: Climate, KM 7). In the tropics, ocean warming has already led to widespread coral reef bleaching and/or outbreaks of coral diseases off the coastlines of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, and Hawai‘i and the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands (Ch. 20: U.S. Caribbean, KM 2; Ch. 27: Hawai‘i & Pacific Islands, KM 4). By mid-century, widespread coral bleaching is projected to occur annually in Hawai‘i and the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands (Figure 1.14). Bleaching and ocean acidification are expected to result in loss of reef structure, leading to lower fisheries yields and loss of coastal protection and habitat, with impacts on tourism and livelihoods in both regions (Ch. 20: U.S. Caribbean, KM 2; Ch. 27: Hawai‘i & Pacific Islands, KM 4). While some targeted response actions are underway (Figure 1.15), many impacts, including losses of unique coral reef and sea ice ecosystems, can only be avoided by significantly reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide (Ch. 9: Oceans, KM 1).

   

Figure 1.14: Severe Coral Bleaching Projected for Hawai‘i and the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands

Severe Coral Bleaching Projected for Hawai‘i and the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands
Figure 1.14: The figure shows the years when severe coral bleaching is projected to occur annually in the Hawaiʻi and U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands region under a higher scenario (RCP8.5). Darker colors indicate earlier projected onset of coral bleaching. Under projected warming of approximately 0.5°F per decade, all nearshore coral reefs in the region will experience annual bleaching before 2050. From Figure 27.10, Ch. 27: Hawai‘i & Pacific Islands (Source: NOAA).

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Promoting Coral Reef Recovery

Promoting Coral Reef Recovery
Figure 1.15: Examples of coral farming in the U.S. Caribbean and Florida demonstrate different types of …

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Human Health and Well-Being

Higher temperatures, increasing air quality risks, more frequent and intense extreme weather and climate-related events, increases in coastal flooding, disruption of ecosystem services, and other changes increasingly threaten the health and well-being of the American people, particularly populations that are already vulnerable. Future climate change is expected to further disrupt many areas of life, exacerbating existing challenges and revealing new risks to health and prosperity.

     

Figure 1.16: Projected Change in Very Hot Days by 2100 in Phoenix, Arizona

Projected Change in Very Hot Days by 2100 in Phoenix, Arizona
Figure 1.16: (left) The chart shows the average annual number of days above 100°F in Phoenix, Arizona, for 1976–2005, and projections of the average number of days per year above 100°F through the end of the 21st century (2070–2099) under the lower (RCP4.5) and higher (RCP8.5) scenarios. Dashed lines represent the 5th–95th percentile range of annual observed values. Solid lines represent the 5th–95th percentile range of projected model values. (right) The map shows hydration stations and cooling refuges (cooled indoor locations that provide water and refuge from the heat during the day) in Phoenix in August 2017. Such response measures for high heat events are expected to be needed at greater scales in the coming years if the adverse health effects of more frequent and severe heat waves are to be minimized. Sources: (left) NOAA NCEI, CICS-NC, and LMI; (right) adapted from Southwest Cities Heat Refuges (a project by Arizona State University’s Resilient Infrastructure Lab), available here. Data provided by Andrew Fraser and Mikhail Chester, Arizona State University.

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Rising temperatures pose a number of threats to human health and quality of life (Figure 1.16). High temperatures in the summer are linked directly to an increased risk of illness and death, particularly among older adults, pregnant women, and children (Ch. 18: Northeast, Box 18.3). With continued warming, cold-related deaths are projected to decrease and heat-related deaths are projected to increase. In most regions, the increases in heat-related deaths are expected to outpace the reductions in cold-related deaths (Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 1). Rising temperatures are expected to reduce electricity generation capacity while increasing energy demands and costs, which can in turn lead to power outages and blackouts (Ch. 4: Energy, KM 1; Ch. 11: Urban, Regional Summary, Figure 11.2). These changes strain household budgets, increase people’s exposure to heat, and limit delivery of medical and social services. Risks from heat stress are higher for people without access to housing with sufficient insulation or air conditioning (Ch. 11: Urban, KM 1).

Community Relocation—Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana

Community Relocation—Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana
Figure 1.17: (left) A federal grant is being used to relocate the tribal community of Isle de Jean Charles, …

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Changes in temperature and precipitation can increase air quality risks from wildfire and ground-level ozone (smog). Projected increases in wildfire activity due to climate change would further degrade air quality, resulting in increased health risks and impacts on quality of life (Ch. 13: Air Quality, KM 2; Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 1). Unless counteracting efforts to improve air quality are implemented, climate change is expected to worsen ozone pollution across much of the country, with adverse impacts on human health (Figure 1.21) (Ch. 13: Air Quality, KM 1). Earlier spring arrival, warmer temperatures, changes in precipitation, and higher carbon dioxide concentrations can also increase exposure to airborne pollen allergens. The frequency and severity of allergic illnesses, including asthma and hay fever, are expected to increase as a result of a changing climate (Ch. 13: Air Quality, KM 3).

Adaptation Measures in Kivalina, Alaska

Adaptation Measures in Kivalina, Alaska
Figure 1.18: A rock revetment was installed in the Alaska Native Village of Kivalina in 2010 to reduce increasing …

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Rising air and water temperatures and changes in extreme weather and climate-related events are expected to increase exposure to waterborne and foodborne diseases, affecting food and water safety. The geographic range and distribution of disease-carrying insects and pests are projected to shift as climate changes, which could expose more people in North America to ticks that carry Lyme disease and mosquitoes that transmit viruses such as West Nile, chikungunya, dengue, and Zika (Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 1; Ch. 16: International, KM 4).

Mental health consequences can result from exposure to climate- or extreme weather-related events, some of which are projected to intensify as warming continues (Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 1). Coastal city flooding as a result of sea level rise and hurricanes, for example, can result in forced evacuation, with adverse effects on family and community stability as well as mental and physical health (Ch. 11: Urban, KM 1). In urban areas, disruptions in food supply or safety related to extreme weather or climate-related events are expected to disproportionately impact those who already experience food insecurity (Ch. 11: Urban, KM 3).

Indigenous peoples have historical and cultural relationships with ancestral lands, ecosystems, and culturally important species that are threatened by climate change (Ch. 15: Tribes, KM 1; Ch. 19: Southeast, KM 4, Case Study “Mountain Ramps”; Ch. 24: Northwest, KM 5). Climate change is expected to compound existing physical health issues in Indigenous communities, in part due to the loss of traditional foods and practices, and in some cases, the mental stress from permanent community displacement (Ch. 14: Human Health, KM 2; Ch. 15: Tribes, KM 2). Throughout the United States, Indigenous peoples are considering or actively pursuing relocation as an adaptation strategy in response to climate-related disasters, more frequent flooding, loss of land due to erosion, or as livelihoods are compromised by ecosystem shifts linked to climate change (Ch. 15: Tribes, KM 3). In Louisiana, a federal grant is being used to relocate the tribal community of Isle de Jean Charles in response to severe land loss, sea level rise, and coastal flooding (Figure 1.17) (Ch. 19: Southeast, KM 2, Case Study “A Lesson Learned for Community Resettlement”). In Alaska, coastal Native communities are already experiencing heightened erosion driven by declining sea ice, rising sea levels, and warmer waters (Figure 1.18). Coastal and river erosion and flooding in some cases will require parts of communities, or even entire communities, to relocate to safer terrain (Ch. 26: Alaska, KM 2). Combined with other stressors, sea level rise, coastal storms, and the deterioration of coral reef and mangrove ecosystems put the long-term habitability of coral atolls in the Hawai‘i and U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands region at risk, introducing issues of sovereignty, human and national security, and equity (Ch. 27: Hawai‘i & Pacific Islands, KM 6).


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